stuffandsonenterprises:


Booosh : True Detective
nevver:

Ignore

cemeterycigarettes:

Anton Konashuk Photography

THIS IS MY NEW FAVORITE THING ON TUMBLR GOODNESS

(Source: asylum-art, via wilwheaton)

my interpretation of Elsa’s “Let it go”

(Source: doctaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa, via bookoisseur)

rstevens:

Tonight’s comic is REALLY OFFENDED

pentecost:

Matthias Clamer’s Bergman-themed photos for It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia (x)

(via wilwheaton)

leonardodicrapio:

Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. at The Share Party in 1960, photo by Bernie Abramson

leonardodicrapio:

Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. at The Share Party in 1960, photo by Bernie Abramson

(via deforest)

generic-scrubnoob asked: In the interest of full equality, do you think women should have to sign up for the draft? I mean, it's only fair that they should fight and die the same, if they want to live free the same, right?

wilwheaton:

Nobody should have to sign up for the draft, even straw men (or women).

projectunbreakable:

nine photographs portraying quotes said to sexual assault survivors by police officers, attorneys, and other authority figures

more info about project unbreakable here

original tumblr here

previously: nine photographs portraying quotes said to sexual assault survivors by their friends/family

(via smellslikegirlriot)

nevver:

Astroboy
entediadoateamorte:

There are frogs falling from the sky.
Philip Seymour Hoffman as Phil Parma.
- Magnolia (1999), directed by Paul Thomas Anderson.
The book says, “We might be through with the past, but the past ain’t through with us.”

entediadoateamorte:

There are frogs falling from the sky.

Philip Seymour Hoffman as Phil Parma.

- Magnolia (1999), directed by Paul Thomas Anderson.

The book says, “We might be through with the past, but the past ain’t through with us.”

nevver:

Dead at 46, Philip Seymour Hoffman
kylarose:


“It wasn’t that they were pictures of me, that wasn’t the reason, exactly. But they were so funny and earnest. And I couldn’t bear to have them laughed at by anyone, you see. It was like making fun of ghosts of dear ones who had died. You know how you feel when you see a picture even today, in which someone is playing, now dead? You don’t even know the person; to you, it’s just a movie actor whose face is familiar to you. But even so, when he’s flashed on screen, a feeling comes over you … there’s a faint jolt. A little cold draught from the Beyond … 
Can you imagine then, what it’s like to me when an old picture is revived, and I see the living shadows of friends dead these many years? Or maybe not dead—dropped out, forgotten, starving somewhere, perhaps? Someone who started with the same bright goal that I had—but lost the way?… 
I can’t explain it, exactly, but those crazy old films have the power to wrench me as nothing new and splendid can ever do. Those crazy, preposterous pictures were to us literally life and death. 
So whenever I see one of those old films, the faces of those who were failures leap out of the celluloid in protest, and those who died stare from the film reproachfully, that this audience of today should find them grotesque… so I feel like saving them from the ridicule.”

— Mary Pickford to Florence Fisher Parry on the personal reasons behind her intention to have all her silent films destroyed following her death.

kylarose:

“It wasn’t that they were pictures of me, that wasn’t the reason, exactly. But they were so funny and earnest. And I couldn’t bear to have them laughed at by anyone, you see. It was like making fun of ghosts of dear ones who had died. You know how you feel when you see a picture even today, in which someone is playing, now dead? You don’t even know the person; to you, it’s just a movie actor whose face is familiar to you. But even so, when he’s flashed on screen, a feeling comes over you … there’s a faint jolt. A little cold draught from the Beyond …

Can you imagine then, what it’s like to me when an old picture is revived, and I see the living shadows of friends dead these many years? Or maybe not dead—dropped out, forgotten, starving somewhere, perhaps? Someone who started with the same bright goal that I had—but lost the way?…

I can’t explain it, exactly, but those crazy old films have the power to wrench me as nothing new and splendid can ever do. Those crazy, preposterous pictures were to us literally life and death.

So whenever I see one of those old films, the faces of those who were failures leap out of the celluloid in protest, and those who died stare from the film reproachfully, that this audience of today should find them grotesque… so I feel like saving them from the ridicule.”

— Mary Pickford to Florence Fisher Parry on the personal reasons behind her intention to have all her silent films destroyed following her death.

(via deforest)